100 Industrial Dr. Ivyland, PA 18974
Mon-Fri: 06:00AM - 6:00PM
What You Can Grow In Shady Spaces

What You Can Grow In Shady Spaces

All shade is not equal. Some shady conditions will yield much more produce than others will, while some areas are better left for hostas and moss. Gardeners should be familiar with the different types of shade, but should also keep in mind that measuring how much shade your garden gets isn’t always easy.

Grass, and most other plants, thrive in sunlight. They use it to get a lot of their energy, so if they are not placed in a well-sunned area, they may suffer. If grass has an average of four to six hours of sunlight a day, that is enough to survive. What if you have an area of your property that cannot provide that, though? Fortunately, there are other options for Triangle-area property owners.

Shade-tolerant grasses

One possibility is simply to plant a more tolerant strand of grass in that part of the property. Grasses that are known for being able to do a bit better in the shade include:

  • Cool-season grasses: tall fescue, fine fescue, rye
  • Warm-season grasses: St. Augustine, zoysia

Alternate ground cover

As it turns out, turf-grass is not the only possible ground cover. Certain other plants can be used as ground cover and are much more tolerant of not receiving direct sunlight. Ajuga, pachysandra, golden star, and sweet woodruff are all good options, among many others.

Leafy vegetables

Vegetables like green peppers, tomatoes, and cucumbers that grow from a blossom do not do well in the shade. Root vegetables do a little better, but still do not thrive. Leafy greens, though, like spinach and salad greens, actually prefer growing in more shaded areas. Consider planting a vegetable garden in the shade using these plants.

Consult Blue Grass Lawn Service & Landscaping

When in doubt, consult the experts, though. Flowers, vegetables, alternative ground cover, and shade-tolerant grasses are only some of the possibilities – we can find the best option to fit your needs. If you live in Apex, Cary, Garner, Clayton, Fuquay-Varina, Holly Springs, Johnston County, Wake County, Wake Forest or the surrounding areas, give Barefoot and Associates to discuss your options for growing plants in a shady area.

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.